Tomorrow’s networked researcher profile page: a call for ideas (and ten minutes of your time) #dhiha6

We’re used to being able to easily find researchers’ profile pages on the web, often more than one about one and the same researcher. These profile pages go far beyond the digital version of a traditional CV (“curriculum vitae”). A workshop within the Digital Humanities Experiments event on 11/12 June 2015 at the German Historical Institute Paris (DHIP), led by mathematician David Chavalarias and me, will be held to explore tomorrow’s networked researchers’ profile pages. Here’s how I aim to do it, and how you can be part of the experience! (This blog post is meant to be a – rather small – contribution to DHIP’s blog carnival accompanying the whole event!)

Before we go into the depth of common services, software and data around scholarly profiles, I want to start the workshop with two simple questions:

  1. What should your own networked researcher profile look like?
  2. What should a profile page look like for some researcher that you don’t know personally (yet), to support your decision if you should work together with that researcher?

Pick one of these two questions. Next, grab a pencil and a piece of paper. Take 10 minutes time. Draw the profile page that you imagine. If you want to, just add some text for explanation, but you can do that later on when presenting your page to the group as well.

Even if you are unable to join us in Paris: we warmly invite you to participate! Take a photo of your sketch with your phone, send me your sketch until Friday, 11 June 2015 2.30 p.m. (Central European Summer Time), and I will blog a collection of them publicly. If you want to remain anonymous, no problem though.

When the workshop is done, I’ll blog about the landscape of existing software and data for these kind of services in detail, but first, it’s up to you. Please don’t hesitate, and don’t feel constrained by anything. Obviously, there will be no „wrong“ sketches – just many ideas adding to a colourful impression on what a scholarly profile page may look like. Have fun!

Veröffentlicht in: Open Science Schlagworte: , , , , .

2 Comments

  1. Pingback: Impact of Social Sciences – What will the scholarly profile page of the future look like? Provision of metadata is enabling experimentation.

  2. Pingback: What will the scholarly profile page of the future look like? Provision of metadata is enabling experimentation. | Wilbur

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